TYPES OF WOOD BUILDING FRAMING SYSTEMS BASIC AND TUTORIALS

BUILDING FRAME SYSTEM THAT USES WOOD BASIC INFORMATION
What Are The Different Building Framing System Using Wood?


There are various types of framing systems that can be used in wood buildings. The most common type of wood-frame construction uses a system of horizontal diaphragms and vertical shearwalls to resist lateral forces, and specifically with the design of this basic type of building.

At one time building codes classified a shearwall building as a box system, which was a good physical description of the way in which the structure resists lateral forces. However, building codes have dropped this terminology, and most wood-frame shearwall buildings are now classified as bearing wall systems.

It is felt that the designer should first have a firm understanding of the behavior of basic shearwall buildings and the design procedures that are applied to them. With a background of this nature, the designer can acquire from currently available sources the design techniques for other systems.

The basic bearing wall system can be constructed entirely from wood components. See Fig. 1.1. Here the roof, floors, and walls use wood framing.


In addition to buildings that use only wood components, other common types of construction make use of wood components in combination with some other type or types of structural material. Perhaps the most common mix of structural materials is in buildings that use wood roof and floor systems and concrete tiltup or masonry (concrete block or brick) shearwalls.

See Fig. 1.2. This type of construction is common, especially in one-story commercial and industrial buildings. This construction is economical for small buildings, but its economy improves as the size of the building increases.


Trained crews can erect large areas of panelized roof systems in short periods of time. See Fig. 1.3.


Design procedures for the wood components used in buildings with concrete or masonry walls are also illustrated throughout this book. The connections between wood and concrete or masonry elements are particularly important and are treated in considerable detail.

Wind and seismic (earthquake) are the two lateral forces that are normally taken into account in the design of a building. In recent years, design for lateral forces has become a significant portion of the design effort.

The reason for this is an increased awareness of the effects of lateral forces. In addition, the building codes have substantially revised the design requirements for both wind and seismic forces. These changes are the result of extensive research in wind engineering and earthquake-resistant design.

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