PAYMENT REQUESTS AND CHANGE ORDERS ROLE OF ARCHITECT OR ENGINEER DURING CONSTRUCTION BASICS AND TUTORIALS

PAYMENT REQUESTS AND CHANGE ORDERS ROLE OF ARCHITECT OR ENGINEER DURING CONSTRUCTION BASIC INFORMATION
Payment Requests & Change Order Role Of Architects Or Engineers In Civil Projects


Payment Requests
The contractor normally submits a consolidated payment request monthly to the architect and client for review and certification.

The payment request should be subdivided by trade and compared with the schedule of values for each trade that would have been submitted with the subcontractor bid if required by the instructions to bidders and bid form.

The architect should review the payment request with respect to the percentage of completion of the pertinent work item or trade. Some clients or lending institutions require that a partial waiver of lien be submitted for each work item or trade with each payment request.

This partial waiver of lien can either be for the prior monthly request, which will indicate that the prior month’s payment has been received, or in certain cases for the current monthly request.

If the latter procedure is followed, the waiver may require revision, depending on the architect’s review, if a work-item or trade-payment request is modified.

The architect is not expected to audit the payment request or check the mathematical calculations for accuracy.

Change Orders
Contractor’s change-order requests require the input of the architect, engineer, and client and are usually acted on as part of the payment request procedure. A change order is the instrument for amending the original contract amount and schedule, as submitted with the bid and agreed on in the client-contractor contract.

Change orders can result from departures from the contract documents ordered during construction, by the architect, engineer, or client; errors or omissions; field conditions; unforeseen subsoil; or other similar conditions.

A change order outlines the nature of the change and the effect, if any, on the contract amount and construction schedule. Change orders can occur with both a zero cost and zero schedule change.

Nevertheless, they should be documented in writing and approved by the contractor, architect, and client to acknowledge that the changes were made, with no impact.

Change orders are also used to permit a material substitution when a material or system not included in the contract documents is found acceptable by the client and architect.

 For material substitutions proposed by the contractor, schedule revisions are not normally recognized as a valid change.

The sum of the change-order amounts is added or deducted from the original contract amount. Then, the revised contract amount is carried forward on the contractor’s consolidated application for payment after the change orders have been signed by all parties.

The normal contractor payment request procedure is then followed, on the basis of the new contract amount. If the schedule is changed because of a change order, the subsequent issue of the construction schedule should indicate the revised completion or move-in date, or both, that result from the approved change.

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